Kicking Dogs: Angry Chileans

Chilensis tends to get most exciting when people are really angry.  Nothing quite beats counting how many times the neighbors use a form of “huevón” when they’re yelling at each other.

But today, we’re just going to cover some basic ways to point out that someone is angry.

Estar chato

Or estar harto: to be fed up.  When I say I’m chata, it means I’m on the verge of getting pissed.  You will often hear people say that certain things or people “have” them chato or harto.

Estos trámites me tienen chato.  (This paper work is pissing me off.)

Choreado

Ticked off.  This is a little less angry than cabreado, which is used frequently in Chile, but I guess it’s also used in Spain, so I’m officially leaving it out.  Regardless, the little boy in the video below gives a fantastic performance of choreado

Empelotado

While this can also mean “en pelota” or “butt naked,” in certain contexts it means really angry.  Or, in the case of this father who protested the high costs of education while naked, it means both.

Emputecido

Girlfriend throws him a surprise party; he gets pissed because she hides things from him

In normal Spanish, emputecer is to prostitute oneself.  In Chile, it means to get really angry.  I mean beside yourself, fuming angry.

How or why it made the transition, I’m not sure.  Our best guess is that when angry, you might run about saying puta a whole lot.  Any other guesses?

Andar pateando la perra

Jorge Sampaoli anda pateando la perra

You know when you’re so angry you just want to kick a dog?  Specifically a female dog?  Actually, I don’t think I’ve ever wanted to kick a dog… but I know what it’s like to be so miffed that I’m walking around kicking at the air and muttering under my breath.

Jorge Sampaoli, the coach for Chile’s national soccer team, is pictured to the right, kicking a dog after Chile and Spain tie during overtime.

That’s it for today, folks!  Have a good weekend, keep calm, and don’t kick dogs.

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2 thoughts on “Kicking Dogs: Angry Chileans

  1. I can’t wait to actually hear these colloquialisms! I just launched an IndieGoGo campaign to accelerate my road-trip to Chile.

    I lived in Canada for months before I realized that “pissed” was a completely different animal in the Great White North than in the States. Seems folks talked about being “pissed,” all the time, “pissed to the gills,” “beyond pissed,” but they didn’t seem angry and there was nothing to indicate they were angry by the surrounding words and phrases. It wasn’t until I mentioned that I was “pissed off” about something at work to a group at the bar that we realized we needed to share regional meanings.

    Pissed = Drunk in Canadia, eh?
    Pissed = Angry in the States.

    A lot of humor learning regional and cultural expressions that don’t seem to make any sense at first. Thanks for all the gems you share.

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